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October 25, 2014
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Review: Group steers toward new sound

"So Long, See You Tomorrow

Bombay Bicycle Club

In song, Bombay Bicycle Club’s frontman, Jack Steadman, is a wishful and love-brooding loner who only wants to be asleep throughout the day. In life, he’s daring and enterprising — a music generator whose business model centers on boundless exploration and dizzying productivity.

So much so, that when the group decided to take a gap year from the typical album-a-year cycle, Steadman would spend his downtime gallivanting across the globe. It was in these travels that he would find the inspiration to pen and produce the group’s fourth studio record, “So Long, See You Tomorrow,” a 10-song compilation mash-up of Eurodisco and Middle-Eastern dance grooves.

The album opens to a manipulated, slowed-down Bollywood sample loop, which gives way to the digitally spliced-up keyboard notes of the record’s second track, “It’s Alright Now.” With a steady-building tempo, the song is anchored by an armory of percussive elements, until the high-rising, falsetto chorus kicks in, where Steadman cries out, “If only you could see mine/ Running out dry/ Some of these feelings never died.” The song serves as an emotional and musical climax on the album, invoking both nostalgia for the past and an urgency to move forward.

Lead singles “Luna” and “Carry Me” shift to more vibrant and bright sounds, providing bursts of sudden energy with jagged-riffs and a sauntering marimba line. However, the real standout track on the album is “Come To.” One of two piano-led ballads on the record, the song begins with a sequence of electro-pop beats before collapsing into a fused samba rhythm-and-blues mix with glossed-over, sugary vocals. A standout track, “Come To” is a rare venture into an exotic-indie euphoria.

“So Long, See You Tomorrow” captures the best of the retro-indie group as it cycles full speed ahead on a path less traveled. Bold and electrifying, the album sees Bombay Bicycle Club confidently delving into a new melodic and textural sound that will guide listeners straight to the dance floor.