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October 25, 2014
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Opinion

Editorial: Who’s washed-up

SWUGs often take pride in refusing to conform to social expectations, however, they need to be careful when describing themselves as “washed-up”

The recent popularization of the term “SWUG,” or “Senior Washed-Up Girl,” may have defined senior year for some at college. In publishing our own version, the writer sought to use the term SWUG ironically, not to define her image as “washed-up.” Upon reflection, we realized some may have taken the phrase more literally. The use of the phrase “washed-up” could make SWUG seem like an insult to women who choose not to focus on conforming to social and gender norms.

It seems as though there is nothing a woman can wear without being shamed. If she wears a short skirt and heels, then people call her a slut — but if she wears sweatpants and a hoodie, then she’s “washed-up.” Meanwhile, a man can dress however he wants without facing the same judgement.

Many women who define themselves as SWUGs do so with a sense of pride; they’ll laugh at this phase post-college. While the SWUG life is about not caring what others think, the term creates a negative perception of women. People should consider what it actually means to be “washed-up” and be careful about self-identifying as a SWUG because it can create stereotypes about all females in their last year of college.