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Accuracy • Independence • Integrity

August 24, 2017   |   Ithaca, NY

Accent

Wreckords’ catchy beats put groove in debut LP

Following the abrupt termination of the garage-rock band Louis XIV, guitarist Brian Karscig tried his hand at record production. Before long, Karscig felt the need to be back on the other side of the studio mic and The Nervous Wreckords were born. Last week, the band released their debut LP, “Valuminium,” which treats listeners to a delightfully potent musical drug.

Karscig schemes his way through the song “Josephine” in order to evade his money-hounding landlord, Josephine. The jam keeps spirits peppy with its excitable bass line, dance-inducing beats and an overly catchy synthesizer breakdown. This track effectively showcases the band’s impressive knack for producing ear-captivating hooks.

Throughout “Valuminium,” Karscig samples heavily from his days with Louis XIV, particularly in the guitar riff department. Most of the tracks feature the distinctive down-and-dirty guitar licks that appeal to Louis XIV followers.

“Everything Stops For Tea” acts as a sort of timeline for Karscig’s career in the sense that the song draws influence from every facet of his involvement in the music industry. The cut highlights the grimy guitar lines reminiscent of Louis XIV’s glory days.

One of The Nervous Wreckords’ standout tracks is “Burn It Up.” Listeners will be tempted to move their body to this dance-floor anthem any way they can in conjunction with the addictive melody.

In their debut album, The Nervous Wreckords have established they are not just another spin-off band from an unfortunate breakup. They are able to harness their previous musical experiences and create something original and appealing. “Valuminium” will cure all of a listener’s musical maladies — and Dr. Karscig recommends they fill their prescription.