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Accuracy • Independence • Integrity

August 23, 2017   |   Ithaca, NY

Blogs

Walk the Talk

What a week! I have been so wrapped up in exploring the Centennial State, that I have had little time for much else (like blogging), but have no fear, as I am back and ready to spew my facts and anecdotes. The AASHE conferences was a wonderful experience. Most of the conference was spent attending sessions and learning about what other colleges were teaching at their schools in relation to sustainability. But we aren’t just talking environmental studies courses, we are talking about courses across all majors that have been able to incorporate sustainability principles and practices into their curriculum. (My favorite course was an architecture course taught at Lawrence Technological University where students helped redesign and create more sustainable portions of Detroit.)

After my presentation on using the climate change conferences as educational opportunities for students, I helped a few professors, including ones from IC, Dickinson College and Pacific University, put on their sessions called Is it time for a revolution? After passing out buttons that said “Join the Revolution,” to anyone and everyone, tons of professors and students at the conference attended the session. In my opinion, it was an incredibly successful session, and that wasn’t just because I helped. (Well, maybe a little.) But in all seriousness, what made the session successful was that it seemed to be the only session that wasn’t just talking about what was already done, it was pushing and encouraging everyone to walk the talk and start making change that wasn’t done yet. It was a great end to the conference.

When the conference ended, I decided to stay a few extra days to explore the area. But that’s a post for another day…like tomorrow when I am sitting in the airport, waiting for my flight. Until then…cheers! And remember that, you don’t have to go to a conference to “walk the talk,” sustainability is all around us, we just have to make the leap to attend its lecture.