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Accuracy • Independence • Integrity

May 26, 2019   |   Ithaca, NY

Review: One Republic’s ‘Oh My My’ offers thought-provoking lyrics

By | Oct 17, 2016

“Oh My My,” released Oct. 7, offers listeners a nicely balanced variety between moving power ballads and easy-listening dance tracks.

Review: Passenger’s latest album delivers powerful lyricism

By | Oct 4, 2016

While the album is an enjoyable listen and delivers quality lyrics that Passenger is known for, it lacks musical diversity as a whole.

Review: ‘Blair Witch’ fails with repetitive plotline

By | Sep 26, 2016

There’s no fooling the internet, which is where this sequel belongs. “Blair Witch” would be better served as a YouTube short than as a feature film.

Review: Mac Miller’s ‘The Divine Feminine’ lacks originality

By | Sep 26, 2016

In “The Divine Feminine,” Miller tries to show he has the chops to make more intricate tracks. He proves his talent by executing talented flow.

Review: Moose Blood’s raw vocals shine on ‘Stay Beautiful’

By | Sep 19, 2016

The group made waves with “Stay Beautiful,” a two-piece acoustic Spotify exclusive, released Sept. 8. Following the release of their second full-length album, “Blush,” “Stay Beautiful” is a coupling of two songs that successfully encompasses the two themes that are most prevalent in Moose Blood’s music: family and love. Their deeply personal lyrics translate beautifully into the stories told by the E.P.’s tracks, “Glow” and “Knuckles.”

The first track, “Glow,” opens up with slow, melodic guitar strumming, which sets a melancholy tone for the rest of the track. The instrumentals are followed by the lyrics, “I said goodbye today / I just watched you drive away / I just stood with mum and waved.” The combination of Eddy Brewerton’s raw vocals and the guitarist’s soft melodies add a heart-wrenching touch to the song. The lyrics provide insight to the difficulties of being separated from one’s father, while sweet melodies and instrumentals envelop the listener. Released as a single on Jun. 1, “Knuckles” is a true anthem to those who have experienced unrequited love. Opening up with the lyrics, “It wasn’t hard to fall for you / You had it all planned out, didn’t you,” the song offers an introspective look at love. The track builds on this knowledge, providing slow, low instrumentals to accompany it, adding to the emotion. It continues later with “That thing you said, stay beautiful / Even though that I know that it’s second hand,” providing more evidence of the heartache being felt by the artist while also referencing the name of the E.P., “Stay Beautiful.” During the last run through of those lines, there are moments of unaccompanied vocals where the listener is left with nothing between them and the music. It’s a period of reflection, for both the listener and the musician.

Review: Frank Ocean’s visual album ‘Endless’ addresses his fame

By | Sep 14, 2016

Ocean’s 45-minute film gives viewers more than expected. With a combination of mesmerizing lyrics and several look-alikes, he presents himself as prodigal and self-aware. Under the limelight, it’s difficult for artists to remain down-to-earth.

Review: Emotional distress contributes to depth of Michaelson’s album

By | Sep 3, 2016

Despite the title, Michaelson’s new album is her most logical and cohesive compilation to date. Her typical quirky sound, complete with witty lyrics and sweet sentiment, sounds much more mature than in her previous albums.

Review: Spears’ signature sound cannot appeal to modern listeners

By | Aug 30, 2016

Her signature 90s sound — the peppy synth beats, generic bass drops and basic lyrics — feels stale compared to her contemporaries, like Nicki Minaj and Beyoncé. Each song may have topped the charts in Spears’ heyday, but now the tracks feel forced and inauthentic. Her album may have been better received had she made more of an effort to stay current.

Review: ‘War Dogs’ film barks up the wrong tree

By | Aug 30, 2016

Packouz and Diveroli’s relationship is certainly an entertaining one: The combination of Packouz’s snarky personality and Diveroli’s ignorance makes for funny dialogue. However, the protagonists of “War Dogs” aren’t dynamic; there doesn’t seem to be much growth or change for either character. Not to mention, the story itself didn’t do a great job of making the audience feel connected to the characters.

Review: Villain takes the lead in new series

By | Apr 30, 2014

DC Comics focuses on one of its most notorious villains in it’s newest series.