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Accuracy • Independence • Integrity

August 18, 2017   |   Ithaca, NY

Accent

Review: Owl City slumps with fourth album

 

Back with more electronics than a Skrillex single and more artificial sunshine than a fluorescent lightbulb, Owl City’s “The Midsummer Station” condenses a season of sunlight into one lackluster album.

Adam Young, the founder and frontman of the one-man band, released his second album, “Ocean Eyes,” which launched him into the high-spirited pop world with singles such as “Fireflies” and “Vanilla Twilight.”

However, his fourth studio album does not prove to be as worthy. His single “Good Time,” featuring the newest bubblegum-pop sweetheart Carly Rae Jepsen, is exhaustingly upbeat with just hints of summertime exuberance. The track’s confused-themed lyrics only beg to have the same infectious quality as Katy Perry’s hit single, “Last Friday Night (T.G.I.F).”

Young’s heavily auto-tuned vocal style is exemplified in the track “Dreams and Disasters.” In the style of recent pop music, the song features heavy club beats that distract the listener from the instrumental quality of the track. The expected repetitive lyrics do not help Young’s case either. His lack of variety becomes boring and, eventually, annoying to listen to.

A softer tune, “Silhouette,” channels the longing vibe from his previous hit single “Vanilla Twilight.” However, Young’s high-pitched, soft vocals croon throughout the track in a creepy manner, all while he sings of rainbows and “summer stars to lead me home.” This only makes him sound like a lonely, lost child with only his teddy bear to keep him company.

Though Young’s initial success made Owl City a prominent name in the electro-pop scene, “The Midsummer Station” may make listeners shut off the radio to save their ears from the noise.

  Back with more electronics than a Skrillex single and more artificial sunshine than a fluorescent lightbulb, Owl City’s “The Midsummer Station” condenses a season of sunlight into one lackluster album. Adam Young, the founder and frontman of the one-man band, released his second album, “Ocean Eyes,” which launched him into the high-spirited pop world